How to Break Data Into Quartiles in Excel

How to Break Data Into Quartiles in Excel
How to Break Data Into Quartiles in Excel

Mathematical statistics have a significant role and are frequently used. In statistics, the idea of quarters is crucial. Educate yourself further about quarters and the Quartile Formula.

Quartile Calculation

Quartile is a statistical term that divides the data into four quarters, just as it sounds phonetically. On the number line, it essentially separates the data points into a data set into four quarters. One thing to remember is that data points can be random, so we must first arrange those numbers in ascending order on the number line before dividing them into quartiles. It essentially serves as an extended middle. Data is divided into two equal parts by the median, and into four parts by the quartiles.

A quartile divides a group of observations into four equally sized segments. The median value for the first phrase makes up the first quartile. Second quartile is the median. The third quartile is the midpoint between the median and the final term.

A set of data’s quartiles can be determined manually, however using the quartile formula in Microsoft Excel makes the process easier. Statistics that divide a collection of data into four equal sections are known as quartiles. The first quartile is reached by 75% of the numbers in the set, whereas the third quartile is reached by 25% of the numbers.

More than half of the values are greater than or equal to the median, or second quartile. (See First Reference) The Excel quartile formula is formatted as follows: QUARTILE (range, quart). The words “range” and “quart” in the formula stand for the range of cells containing the data and the quartile number, respectively.

How do you split data into Quartiles in Excel?

  1. Step 1: In Excel, enter a collection of data that you wish to find the quartiles for in a range of cells in the order of smallest to largest. For instance, select cell A1. In cells A1 through A8, type “2,” “3,” “4”, “5”, “5,” “6,” “8,” and “9,” in that order. After typing in each cell, hit “Enter.”
  2. Step 2: In cell C1, click.
  3. Step 3: In cells C1 through C3, type “First Quartile,” “Second Quartile,” and “Third Quartile,” correspondingly. After typing in each cell, hit “Enter.”
  4. Step 4: In cell D1, click.
  5. Step 5: To find the first quartile of the set of data, type “=” and the quartile formula, along with the range cells that hold the data and “1” for the quartile number. After finishing typing, hit “Enter.” Type “=QUARTILE(A1:A8,1),” for instance, and hit “Enter.” The first quartile of the data set in cells A1 through A8 is equal to this, which is 3.75. (See Bibliography (2)
  6. Step 6: In cell D2, click.
  7. Step 7: To find the first quartile of the set of data, enter “=” and the quartile formula, along with the range cells that hold the data and “2” for the quartile number. After finishing typing, hit “Enter.” Type “=QUARTILE(A1:A8,2),” for instance, and hit “Enter.” The second quartile of the data set in cells A1 through A8 is 5, which is equivalent to this.
  8. Step 8: In cell D3, click.
  9. Step 9: To find the third quartile of the set of data, type “=” and the quartile formula, along with the range cells that contain the data and “3” for the quartile number. After finishing typing, hit “Enter.” Put in “=QUARTILE(A1:A8,3),” for instance, and hit “Enter.” The third quartile of the data set in cells A1 through A8 is equal to 6.5, which is what this equals.